Fannie Who?

The child was born with a lisp so we kindly indulged his impediment by copying his adaptions. R’s and w’s were particularly difficult to pronounce so Muriel became Mooel, Frances became Fannie, and Howe became Hooe.

He’d quickly become attached to Fannie who was a plain but pleasant young lady visiting her sister in Kenenaw before she gave birth. So when Fannie went missing the child could be heard wailing Fannie Hooe, Fanny Hooe.

But Molly, the wise one, had watched the rapport build between Fannie and the local chief’s son. Unacceptable to either race she had silently vanished.

Carrot Ranch, July 19, 2018, prompt: In 99 words (no more, no less) write a story about Fannie Hooe. Although she is a legend in the Kewenaw, free to go where the prompt leads.

17 comments

      • Whoops, wrong button again, my computer has crashed, I’m on my phone,… I was saying, I joined in all the groups I could. Scouts, rowing club, Football club, golf club, I had to talk to people, my confidence gradually grew, I even became the President of my Football club, and now I actually do poetry readings. I still slur my words a little, but that’s probably from the Stroke I had years ago. 😊

        Liked by 2 people

  1. What happened to poor Fanny? I hope she was able to find a new life somewhere. But I feel sorry for the chief’s young son. He loved Fanny, but even more than that, I think she was his bestie. The one person who accepted him exactly for who he was. How sad that her status as a ‘half-breed’ ensured her disappearance. The poor guys always going to wonder. Nice write 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  2. After reading this story…I sighed.
    Sometimes two people just connect quickly in/with love. And I believe this kind of love will always survive.
    Wonderful story, Kate!
    The way you wrote it and ended it…it gets the readers minds a-goin’ and I like that !
    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

  3. What a sweet story made unique from the child’s perspective. In the wilderness, I’d like to believe one could still disappear outside the constraints of social expectations. Perhaps that’s why some love the wilderness and others fear it.

    Liked by 1 person

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