Expiry Date

Do you ever think what ‘death’ means to you?
Ever wondered about the afterlife or heaven …
Are your beliefs heart felt or blind or tenuous
Thought about how it might happen or when
How would you feel, would your family cope?

Dealt with each loss well or felt fried like hell?
Each reaction measured or out of control
All this may effect the journey of your soul
Talk it all out, analyse your beliefs, check it out
Helps greatly when we or those close do depart!

Deep contemplation puts your mind at ease
Ensures a calmer passing, assured and restful
Alternative is more tumultuous, grief and fear
Take over, panic impacts us and loved ones
Heal into death as its our next big adventure!

37 comments

  1. A very deep and profound thought.Yes, death and afterlife have a different meaning to everyone. I read an awesome book about death and afterlife based on the recommendation on the NPR show.
    if you are interested, I’ll share the name with you. It is a small book with around 150 pages.

    Liked by 1 person

    • NPR stands for National Public Radio, its a network of 900 public radio station here in US.
      Sorry I keep forgetting you are not in US..silly me..
      The book is called” Sum” by David Eagleman.

      Liked by 1 person

  2. I was thinking about this only this morning – I was thinking about what it means to die. Do we just disappear into nothingness? Do we have an eternal soul that moves onto something else or something we haven’t even thought of.
    I don’t know and anything we believe is purely subjective and maybe death is beyond our understanding.

    Liked by 2 people

    • so true but it definitely will happen, investigating our beliefs is essential to have a calm peaceful passing … nobody knows the answer, we just have our own beliefs 🙂

      Like

      • Well yes, it’s the one thing we can be sure will happen.
        I think that is beyond our understanding myself. But I kind of wonder what is it that’s in this she’ll of water and carbon that thinks and feels and stuff. I guess others call it a soul and that’s a good name, but what am I really?

        Liked by 1 person

  3. The Pollyanna positive in me wants to believe there is more after this life…and we are on to another adventure. But, if not, that’s okay with me, too. I’ve already far outlived what doctors said I would and a lot of my life has been wonderful and beautiful! So, I’m okay with whatever comes next for me. 🙂

    Another great, ponderful poem, Kate! 🙂
    HUGS!!! 🙂

    Liked by 1 person

    • How healthy Carol that you do know what it is that you are afraid of … most people haven’t looked that close yet … I think it might be just another adventure 🙂

      Like

  4. Since I am a Sci fi fan I’d like to think there could be an alternate existence that could be very fulfilling. There is so much we do not know about the universe – our small world is just a very tiny speck. If specters (ghosts) unhappily loom about here I’m not sure I’d want to stay bound here. I’m happy to think though that some spirits as angels might still help those living here.

    Liked by 1 person

    • years ago I would not have entertained that notion but I’ve had too many ‘experiences’ to doubt it Jules 🙂 I have no doubt we are one of the lower forms of life in our universe

      Liked by 1 person

  5. Words well chosen, Kate – definitely prompts contemplation.

    Truth is, none of has just one view of Death. As the years undulate, each of us likely has greeted the inevitable with a whole range of emotions, some contradicting each other.

    This is fine. It’s an enormous question, and when we put our minds to it, various “answers” emerge.

    You might say my personal sanguinity reflects my (relative) youth. Fair enough. However, I also have lost my father, grandparents and aunt within the past few years. Yet still, the calmness remains. Perhaps because In know this isn’t “it.” Something vaster, more sophisticated and happier awaits us, and those who already are there.

    Such, at least, is theology as imagined by a (somewhat) lapsed Lutheran.

    Liked by 1 person

    • that makes sense Keith, all our experiences ‘colour’ our perspective and especially childhood faith. Even if lapsed, it is already integrated at a subconscious level.
      And why shouldn’t they be together happy and safe … this is very reassuring! That’s a lot of losses for one so young, mind you most of my grandparents died before I started school … longevity is not in our DNA 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

  6. I don’t think about death, but I prepared myself, I passed everything on to my daughter and grandchildren. I am afraid of pain and helplessness, but it does not depend on me.
    best regards

    Liked by 1 person

  7. Very powerful and evocative words, Kate. It’s inevitable. The cycle of life, but we’ve been taught to fear it — perhaps because people are allowed to linger in suffering for far too long, as their loved ones cling too tightly when it’s time to let go. 💙🙏💙

    Liked by 1 person

    • I worked in hospice care for years and all pain can be controlled if reported correctly! Then there is the emotional pain of unfinished business or family ties … a minister of religion but more often a counsellor can work thru these quite quickly! And that can mean confronting rels that are hampering the process 🙂

      Death should be a peaceful process focused on comforting the dying … the grief process brings the focus back to comforting those remaining 🙂

      Liked by 1 person

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